Tuesday, December 11, 2012

Saturday, December 8, 2012

Charlie Brown Christmas Trees


Trees That Please Nursery has a great selection of Living Christmas Trees including those coveted hard to find Charlie Brown Christmas Trees.


Come by the Nursery and check out our selection of Charlie Brown Christmas Trees today.   Charlie Brown Christmas Trees make a great table top decoration to enjoy through the holidays. After the holidays simply acclimate your tree to outdoor conditions prior to planting. As it grows you can decorate it each holiday season.

We are open:  Tuesday – Saturday    9:00 – 4:00
                        Sunday                       10:00 – 4:00
                        Monday                      Closed


Contact Trees That Please Nursery for more information.

Photos & Narrative By:
Stephen Sain
Staff Plant Physiologist

Monday, December 3, 2012

Landscape Maintenance – Russian Sage


Russian Sage (Perovskia atriplicifolia) is a low water perennial primarily planted because it flowers profusely from late spring until frost. Russian Sage grows with upright, whitish gray stems reaching 3’ – 4’ tall.  Russian Sage has a strong scent especially if stems or leaves are rubbed or bruised. Russian Sage produces abundant spires of small, tubular flowers of blue or lavender color. These spires sometimes reach 1’ -2’ in height.


After the first frosts arrive, Russian Sage goes dormant and its entire mass looks gray brown or dead.


Remnant flowers turn white.


Maintain Russian Sage by cutting back last season’s growth to about 4” – 8” in late fall through early spring before new growth resumes.


It can also be cut back to the ground without any detrimental effect. Removing this gray brown growth ensures the entire plant is a beautiful green when new growth pushes out the following spring.

Russian Sage grows best in full sun, with low to regular water. It is also very heat and drought tolerant. Russian Sage is Hardy to USDA zone 4.

Contact Trees That Please Nursery for more information.

Photos & Narrative By:
Stephen Sain
Staff Plant Physiologist