Monday, November 26, 2012

Trees That Please Nursery: 30 Days of Fall Foliage, Wednesday November 21st.


Texas Madrone

Texas Madrone (Arbutus xalapensis) is also called the Naked Indian Tree or Texas Madroño is a New Mexico native evergreen.  Texas Madrone grows as a small tree or large shrub reaching about 8’ – 12’ tall and wide. As an evergreen, Texas Madrone retains its green foliage through fall and winter.


The trunk and branches of the Texas Madrone are quite striking with peeling (exfoliating) orangish-brown to reddish brown bark.


Leaves are oblong with a rounded point. Texas Madrone produces white flowers in clusters. The fruit is a red berry with a rough surface that will persist on the plant through winter. The red berries against the evergreen leaves add winter interest in the landscape through winter.


Texas Madrone must have good drainage for growth. It is best grown with low to regular water and is Hardy to USDA zone 6. The Texas Madrone is very difficult to propagate from seed and hates to be transplanted.

Contact Trees That Please Nursery for more information and pricing.

Photos & Narrative By:
Stephen Sain
Staff Plant Physiologist

Thursday, November 22, 2012

Black Friday – Saturday - Sunday SALE!!


Our large trees in Root Control Bags will be discounted 50% through Black Friday Weekend.

These are our largest trees. Trunk diameters measuring 2” – 3” – 4”. Some trees 12’ or taller. Basically you get TWO trees for the price of ONE!!!!!

Trees Included:  Bur Oaks, Chinquapin Oaks, Texas Red Oaks, Escarpment Live Oaks, Big Tooth Maples, Valley Oaks, Chinese Pistache, Gambel Oaks, and More….

Great opportunity to get a New Mexico Native shade tree that already has a canopy providing cooling shade. Native trees have the advantage of being fully adapted to New Mexico Heat and Low Rainfall!

Come In and look at our inventory!  Tag your tree for later planting if needed… 

Contact Trees That Please Nursery for more information and pricing.

 

Wednesday, November 21, 2012

Trees That Please Nursery: 30 Days of Fall Foliage, Tuesday November 20th.


Garlic Chives


Garlic Chives (Allium tuberosum) are also known as Chinese Chives or Oriental Garlic. Garlic Chives grow in grass-like clumps that slowly expand each season. Strap-like leaves are long and slender. Break off a leaf or rub them and you will note a strong garlic scent. Flowers are found on slender stalks that stand much taller than the plant. Flowers form from late spring into summer. The star shaped flowers are white and quite showy and attract numerous bees and butterflies. Depending upon the winter cold Garlic Chives may be somewhat evergreen or die off late in the season but regrows in spring with warmer temperatures. Both leaves and flowers stalks are used in seasoning similar to chives.


In late fall with the cold temperatures flowers dry and turn white or crème colored.

 
At the base of the plant leaves may remain green well into late fall or early winter.
 

Flower heads dry, shrivel, and crack open to reveal black seeds.


Seeds can be collected for planting as they readily germinate in spring.

 
Garlic Chives are a nice ornamental plant for the garden to attract pollinating insects or in borders or near walk ways. Garlic Chives are hardy to USDA zone 3 and can be grown with low to regular water.

Contact Trees That Please Nursery for more information and pricing.

Photos & Narrative By:
Stephen Sain
Staff Plant Physiologist

Tuesday, November 20, 2012

BLACK FRIDAY SALE!!


All large trees in our Root Control Bags will be discounted 50%.

These are our largest trees. Trunk diameters measuring 2” – 3” – 4”. Some trees 12’ or taller.

Basically you get TWO trees for the price of ONE!!!!! 

Great opportunity to get a New Mexico Native shade tree that already has a canopy providing cooling shade. Native trees have the advantage of being fully adapted to the New Mexico Heat, Wind, and Low Rainfall!

Come In and look at our inventory!

Contact Trees That Please Nursery for more information and pricing.

Monday, November 19, 2012

Trees That Please Nursery: 30 Days of Fall Foliage, Monday November 19th.


Jujube

 

The Jujube tree (Ziziphus zizyphus) is also known as the Chinese date, red date, or just Jujube. It grows as a small to medium sized tree or shrub reaching 15’ – 20’ tall and 10’ – 15’  wide.  With regular water it can add 2’ – 3’ of growth annually. The leaves are a glossy-green so it makes a very beautiful canopy. Branches usually have spines approximately 1 inch in length. Flowers are produced in spring and summer on branches throughout the tree.

The Jujube tree produces a small fruit that varies in size depending upon variety. Fruits can be round to oblong or egg shaped. At maturity, fruits are brown skinned and look like little apples. Fruits may be eaten at this time and are similar to an apple but less sweet and juicy. After the season’s first frosts the fruits shrivel and turn a darker reddish brown. The shriveled fruits are typically sweeter and chewier, resembling “dates”.  Jujube fruits have elongated seeds that resemble those of dates.


With the onset of fall Jujube foliage shows little color change or sometimes a bit of yellow. It is more common for Jujube leaves to continue growth until the first frosts. At that time leaves die and appear dehydrated while still attached to the tree. Winds will then take them from the tree.


After leaf fall you can observe the crooked branch structure,


and spines


which gives them winter interest especially if some fruits remain attached.


The Jujube tree is a nice ornamental that grows well in the high desert climate. They are best grown with low to regular water and tolerate most soils. Jujubes are hardy to USDA zone 5. They are very heat and drought tolerant.

Contact Trees That Please Nursery for more information and pricing.

Photos & Narrative By:
Stephen Sain
Staff Plant Physiologist

Sunday, November 18, 2012

Trees That Please Nursery: 30 Days of Fall Foliage, Sunday November 18th.

Spineless Prickly Pear


Spineless prickly pear (Opuntia ellisiana) makes a great low maintenance addition to the landscape. They are very heat and drought-tolerant. Spineless prickly pear is ideal for hot dry locations where nothing else will grow, like a sunny south facing wall.

Spineless prickly pears lack the long sharp spines of other varieties but can still stick you with its tiny glochids. Glochids appear as white dots that seem evenly spaced on the prickly pear pads and fruits. Spineless prickly pear can grow 3’- 4’ tall and much wider if left un-managed. Spineless prickly pears flower in late spring or early summer. Flower color changes from yellow to a pink-salmon. Edible fruits, also called tunas, turn red-purple when mature and are used fresh or to make jelly.


It is normal during late fall and the winter months for Spineless prickly pear to wilt (the pads will bend downward). Usually with the onset of freezing night time temperatures the fruits will wilt first.
 
 
Then as the colder winter temperatures set in then the pads will also wilt.


When warmer temperatures resume in spring the pads will again stand erect.

Contact Trees That Please Nursery for more information and pricing.

Photos & Narrative By:
Stephen Sain
Staff Plant Physiologist

Saturday, November 17, 2012

Trees That Please Nursery: 30 Days of Fall Foliage, Saturday November 17th.


Mexican Blue Oak

Mexican Blue Oak (Quercus Oblongifolia) is a New Mexico native evergreen or tardily deciduous tree. As its name implies, it can be recognized by its blue leaves.


Its species name, oblongifolia, refers to its oblong leaves. Mexican Blue Oak is in the white oak family so it may hybridize with other white oak species like Gambel Oak, Gray Oak, and Turbinella Oak. As an oak its fruit is an acorn.

Mexican Blue Oak is a smaller tree reaching about 15’ – 20’ tall and wide. After establishment it can add about 1’ – 1.5’ of growth annually. It has a tap root or deep root system so can be planted closer to structures than surface rooted trees like willows or mulberries.

As an evergreen, the Mexican Blue Oak does not have any change in fall foliage. Instead it retains its beautiful blue foliage through fall and winter.


Its evergreen (ever-blue leaves)
 
 
and bark on more mature specimens adds winter interest to your landscape.

 
The Mexican Blue Oak is best grown with low to regular water in well-drained soils but also tolerates clay. This Oak is hardy to USDA zone 5.

Contact Trees That Please Nursery for more information and pricing.

Written By:
Stephen Sain
Staff Plant Physiologist

Friday, November 16, 2012

Trees That Please Nursery: 30 Days of Fall Foliage, Friday November 16th.


Turpentine Bush

Turpentine Bush (Ericameria laricifolia) is a small evergreen shrub that is native to New Mexico. It normally grows with a rounded or spreading form to about 3’ tall and 3’ – 5’ wide.


Leaves are elongated and somewhat resemble short fat pine needles.


When leaves are crushed they emit a turpentine like or tart-lemony scent. Turpentine Bush flowers in late summer or early fall. Bright yellow flowers cover the plants making them a showy addition to the landscape. Flowers attract bees and butterflies. Turpentine Bush is very heat and drought tolerant once established.

During fall and winter Turpentine Bush retains its green aromatic foliage.


Usually remnant seed clusters persist on the plants into late fall and early winter providing visual interest.


Turpentine Bush is best grown with low to regular water on well-drained soils. It is hardy to USDA Zone 6. This plant makes a great late flowering addition to the xeric landscape.

Contact Trees That Please Nursery for more information and pricing.

Photos & Narrative By:
Stephen Sain
Staff Plant Physiologist

Thursday, November 15, 2012

Trees That Please Nursery: 30 Days of Fall Foliage, Thursday November 15th.


Artemisia Powis Castle


Powis Castle Artemisia is an evergreen or “ever silver” perennial. It is grown for its silvery green foliage which adds color to the landscape. Foliage is also aromatic with a very pleasant smell. Powis Castle Artemisia grows in dense puffy mounds reaching 2’ – 3’ tall and 5’ – 6 wide but can be kept to any desired size with occasional pruning. Leaves are thin and feathery. Powis Castle Artemisia produces yellow flowers that are not as showy as its foliage. Powis Castle Artemisia is low water once established and grows well in full sun.
 
As an evergreen, Powis Castle Artemisia does not change its leaf color in the fall or winter. Instead, it adds color throughout the year particularly through the winter when other plants lose their foliage.


It’s always a pleasure to look at


or to enjoy its scented silvery foliage.


Powis Castle Artemisia is best grown with low to regular water on a well-drained soil. It is hardy to USDA Zone 5.

Contact Trees That Please Nursery for more information and pricing.

Photos & Narrative By:
Stephen Sain
Staff Plant Physiologist

Trees That Please Nursery: 30 Days of Fall Foliage, Wednesday November 14th.

Grapes

Trees That Please Nursery propagates several different table grape varieties including: Red Flame, Thompson, Himrod, Canadice, Reliance, Concord, and Venus. These are all seedless, fresh eating or table grapes. Fruit color ranges from red to pink for Red Flame, Canadice, and Reliance. White or green, for Himrod and Thompson, and blue to purple blue for Concord and Venus. All are very tasty and have their own taste attributes. These can be used for fresh eating, juice, or even wine.

All of these grape varieties normally continue growth until the first killing frost. At that point leaves are killed while attached to the vines and give the appearance of being freeze dried.


Likewise and remaining fruit previously hidden by reveal their presence. This late in the season grapes have usually turned to raisins.


The grape variety Venus (Vitis labrusca) is an American variety that gives very good fall color. Leaves often turn brilliant red-maroon of blood red. Venus can be quite showy in fall.


Contact Trees That Please Nursery for more information and pricing.

Photos & Narrative By:
Stephen Sain
Staff Plant Physiologist

Tuesday, November 13, 2012

Trees That Please Nursery: 30 Days of Fall Foliage, Tuesday November 13th.


Mimosa Tree

 

The Mimosa Tree (Albizia julibrissin) or silk tree can grow 1’-3’ annually with regular water eventually reaching 20’-25’ tall and 25’-30’ wide. It generally grows with a spreading canopy that provides cooling shade over a wide area. Mimosa trees are grown for shade, their fernlike leaves, and silky pink flowers. Flowers bloom from late spring into fall. The Mimosa Tree has fernlike leaves that consist of groups of smaller leaflets.


In fall, Mimosa Leaves can have bright yellow color.


However, they often remain green until the first killing frost. Leaves then appear to dry and shrivel while still attached to branches.
 

They retain their green color almost as it they were freeze dried with the onset of cold weather.

Leaves then fall to the ground adding mulch and nutrients to the soil as they decompose.


Seed pods remain firmly attached to branches well after leaf fall.

On windy days, seeds rattle within the pods providing winter interest.


Mimosa Trees are best grown with low to regular water on a well-drained soil. Mimosa trees are Hardy to USDA Zone 6.

Contact Trees That Please Nursery for more information and pricing.

Experience the beauty and shade of the Mimosa Tree by clicking on the link below:


Photos & Narrative By:
Stephen Sain
Staff Plant Physiologist

Monday, November 12, 2012

Trees That Please Nursery: 30 Days of Fall Foliage, Monday November 12th.


Escarpment Live Oak

New Mexico Live Oak (Quercus fusiformis), also known as Escarpment Live Oak, is a New Mexico native evergreen oak. New Mexico Live Oak has thick glossy green leaves. Its leaf structure varies, from smooth or pointed margins, sometimes even on the same tree. New Mexico Live Oak can have annual growth of up to 4’ per year often reaching 15’ - 20′ or more in height and width. The wild growth form is multi-trunked but if pruned to a single trunk can exceed 20’.

New Mexico Live Oak is very heat and drought tolerant and is best grown in well-drained soils but will tolerate clay. This evergreen oak does well with low to regular water and is hardy to USDA Zone 6.

As an evergreen oak there is no color change associated with fall. Both mature

 
and young trees retain their leaves through winter.


Some trees may have a few older leaves that turn yellow or red. Escarpment Live Oak acorns also ripen in fall.

 
If you look closely leaf veins are usually reddish in the fall also.


This green foliage provides winter interest in your landscape while deciduous trees have lost their leaves exposing branch framework. The New Mexico Live Oak on the other hand looks “alive” all winter.


Contact Trees That Please Nursery for more information, availability, and pricing.

Photos & Narrative By:
Stephen Sain
Staff Plant Physiologist

Sunday, November 11, 2012

Trees That Please Nursery: 30 Days of Fall Foliage, Sunday November 11th.


Chisos Red Oak
The Chisos Red Oak (Quercus gravesii) is one of our featured November Trees of the Month. It is a New Mexico native tree that can produce annual growth of up to 3’per year ultimately reaching 30’ - 35′ tall and 25′ wide.  Its large canopy provides dark cooling shade. Wild populations are often found growing on dry hillsides and other poor soil situations.
     
It’s fall and our Chisos Red Oaks are putting on a spectacular show! Leaves turn a brilliant red-maroon,
orange,
occasionally yellow in the fall.
or a mixture of bright colors in the fall.


As our November Tree of the Month, Chisos Red Oaks are discounted 25%! We have a large selection of Chisos Red Oaks. Need help selecting a tree or cannot make it to the nursery? Click the link below to view a video of our current inventory of 5 gallon Chisos Red Oaks and to see their range of fall foliage.



The Chisos Red Oak makes a great shade tree with fabulous fall foliage. It has deep roots and can be very long-lived. The Chisos Red Oak is best grown in well-drained soils with low to regular water. This oak is Hardy to USDA zone 5.

Contact Trees That Please Nursery for availability and pricing.

Photos & Narrative By:
Stephen Sain
Staff Plant Physiologist

Saturday, November 10, 2012

Trees That Please Nursery: 30 Days of Fall Foliage, Saturday November 10th.


Magness Pear
 
Magness Pear (Pyrus communis) is a medium to large sized, greenish-yellow pear with oval shape and covered with dark spots and sometimes russeted. Magness lacks the classic teardrop shape of Bartlett Pear.

 
Magness Pear has a rich, very sweet, and juicy, flesh that is almost free of grit cells. Magness can be stored for 2-3 months in cool storage. Magness Pear is resistant to fire blight, a bacterial disease of Pears and Apples. Magness Pear is hardy to USDA Zone 5.


Besides being a great tasting pear variety, Magness has beautiful fall color.


Leaves can be red


orange and red,


or a mixture of reddish orange colors.


Magness Pear loses its leaves in early November.
 

Contact Trees That Please Nursery for more information and pricing.

Photos and Narrative By:
Stephen Sain
Staff Plant Physiologist