Friday, October 14, 2016

2016 International Oak Society South West Tour

On September 23 through September 29th members of the IOS joined Michael Melendrez, member and guide on a tour to Southern New Mexico mountains that contain oak woodlands. 
They've expressed their gratitude in this letter that we would like to share with you.

These images were from a hike we did into the foothills of the Organ Mountains near Las Cruces

Monday, September 19, 2016

These are the non cation nutrients

In the red column are the nutrients called Anion, which have a negative charge opposite of the Cation nutrients.  The soil has a negative charge of various strengths called the CEC or Cation Exchange Capacity.  For example sand has a weaker CEC than clay therefore clay can hold more Cation nutrients than sand. However the negative charge of soil will repel the nutrients that already have a negative charge, the Anions in the soil therefore cannot hold onto those nutrients. TerraPro however can hold both Cations and Anions by having the Mechanism of Action of a Chelation Overlay.

Tuesday, September 6, 2016

One of our Chinquapin Oaks

This is a Chinquapin oak that came from us about 10 years ago. Its planted in the desert near Farmington New Mexico.  This tree was grown from seed collected by us from the Capitan Mountains, a native New Mexican population of that species. Its one of the best adapted large shade trees for the urban areas of the high desert areas of the Southwest.

Thursday, September 1, 2016

This is corn I grew in Bosque Farms in order to harvest the corn as silage and then turn the silage into compost.  I treated my side of the field with EndoMaxima (the Soil Secrets Mycorrhizal product) and TerraPro (the Soil Secrets Humic Acid product)  while the field right next to mine did not get Soil Secrets.   Both fields historically were amended with 30 tons of dairy manure per acre per year, resulting in high levels of soil nitrogen.  For that reason on my side of the field I did not apply nitrogen while the other side was fertilized with N.   

What's important about these images is the pink showing up on the bottom foot of the corn stem which indicates nitrate accumulation.  This is indicative of the plant being under stress.  Both fields were identical in soil type and irrigation, with the only difference being Soil Secrets on our side.   Our side shows little to no nitrate accumulation which I believe is proving that our protocol of Molecular Biology is helping to reduce stress on the crop.  The image with Fred standing between the two fields also shows that our treated field on the right  is much taller, has more biomass and out performed the conventional field on the left.  

The final image shows both fields after the corn was harvested and winter oats sown.  The border going down the middle separates the control (without Soil Secrets) on the left hand side of the image with the Soil Secrets treated side, where the germination advantage is more than obvious.  


Friday, July 29, 2016

Building Healthy Soil - October 12th Santa Fe, NM

Come learn the secrets  to soil restoration

 from Michael Melendrez

Santa Fe Botanical Garden

Building Healthy Soil

Thursday, October 12th from 2:00 PM- 4:00 PM

Location- Santa Fe Botanical Garden, 715
Camino Lejo, Santa Fe, NM 87505

Cost:$10 Member/$15 Not-yet-Member

For more information and to register
click this link: