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Improved Nutrient Uptake and Water Conservation provided by Soil Secrets TerraPro Product.

An Albuquerque Metro Soil Ecology company, Soil Secrets LLC has invented the ability to manufacture a bio-identical soil molecular substance that can improve how soil supports vegetation.  Improving the crop or landscape plant material improve its ability to get water out of the soil.  Improve the soils ability to store water for longer periods of time.  Improve the drought tolerable limited of any landscape or crop.  And last but not least improve the vegetation's ability to get mineral nutrition out of the soil.  With the Western States drought impacting both agriculture and urban landscaping, this material can be a game changer in how we manage what we do on farms, in our personal yards and with large public sector landscapes such as parks and sports fields.  It’s all about fixing, the Bio Geo Chemical processes of the soil’s ecology using bio mimicry so that the soils natural biochemistry and terrestrial biosphere of microbiology are working properly.  Using the brute force of adding bulk organic matter such as compost and animal manures will not achieve this goal as easily, effectively or as affordably as TerraPro’s bio-mimicry by Soil Secrets.  TerraPro is cost effective, easy to apply and provides long lasting sustainable benefits!

First it must be understood that the structure of the soil is of critical importance and when soil lacks a good macro aggregate structure it’s difficult to expect or achieve healthy roots of a plant, or healthy soil microbiology.  Both need drainage, oxygen and porous soil to grow in.  Also the macro aggregate soil can hold more water than a soil that is collapsed.   What achieves this process of causing soil particles to aggregate is complicated and involves molecular biology with some Quantum Physics provided by the powerful organic matrix of carbon rich molecules that Soil Secrets calls “Supramolecular Humic Molecules” which are the active ingredients of TerraPro. Some may refer to these molecular substances as humic substances or humic acids, but those terms are too generic and don’t describe accurately the whole story.  Soil Secrets secured Commercial Proprietary Information Contracts with several laboratory facilities, both public and private, including Los Alamos and Sandia National Laboratories, to provide Deliverable information down to a sub atomic level on who these molecules are, how do they work and the success of formulating them as part of a manufacturing process so that they can be provided in huge quantities by Soil Secrets. 

Here are some photos demonstrating just a few of the hundreds of benefits that TerraPro can provide a soil, a farm, or an urban landscape.  The vineyard photos were taken at the San Vicente Ranch in Baja, Mexico in late August of 2014.    


This first image below shows how TerraPro's  Supramolecular Humic Molecules corrected the structure of the clay soil at our research site in Los Lunas New Mexico, where the soil was a highly alkaline collapsed saline and sodic clay soil.   


This is a common problem in irrigated agricultural regions of the world, where salts from the water and from fertilizers have collapsed the soil structure!   This is significant because when soil has poor structure it also is more prone to disease pressure.  It will also not absorb water or air, inhibiting good health of plant roots.   With poor soil structure of clay, water  will sit on the surface until its lost to evaporation.  In the meantime it also seals off the soil from oxygen which contraindicates healthy root function of most plants.  It also decreases the amount of water the soil can store and keep available to the vegetation.   On a global scale we must remember that over 40 percent of the worlds agriculture is performed where the climate is dry and irrigation is required, and the soil’s health is at risk because of conventional agriculture practices.    In which case we need to be able to maximize every drop of water.  

Non treated control  & treated vines side by side:


The photo above shows a control field on the left that was not treated with TerraPro’s supramolecular humic molecules.  On the right is a line of vines that were treated, showing vigorous growth.  In addition, the treated vines only need watering every 12th day, while the control still requires watering every 4th day or else they come stressed.

TerraPro Treated Field:


This photo above was taken of a field that was treated in Spring of 2014 with TerraPro.   Harvesting for making the grapes into wine is underway and the grower and wine maker are extremely happy with the results. 

Non Treated Vines
  


Compare the abundance and size of the grape clusters as well as the color of the leaves on the control (non treated) vines above to those in the image below. 
  
TerraPro Treated Vines:
  


Michael Martin Meléndrez
Managing Member of Soil Secrets LLC
 
Albuquerque's Soil Conditioner Source
505 550-3246

www.soilsecrets.com


Comments

Anonymous said…
How much Ag Grade TerraPro was used to get this water savings benefit, with better production?
Great Question! 1256 kilos per hectare which equals about 1118.7 pounds per acre of Ag Grade TerraPro was used.

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